TEACHERS NOT EVEN RECEIVING 1% PAY AWARD

TEACHERS NOT EVEN RECEIVING 1% PAY AWARD

Too many schools are awarding inflation-busting pay rises to senior management while many classroom teachers are not even receiving the 1% pay award, the TUC Congress in Brighton heard today.

Speaking in the debate on public sector pay the NASUWT – The Teachers’ Union revealed that the average pay award for teachers last year was a paltry 0.6%, even lower than claims by ministers.

Deputy General Secretary Dr Patrick Roach said the pay policies of the government had created not just financial hardship for many teachers, but growing inequality.

This was as schools sat on £2.1 billion in unspent reserves, while many claimed they did not have enough money to pay teachers. Some headteachers have been earning in excess of £400,000 a year, Dr Roach said.

He told the TUC: “For many teachers, these pay reforms have meant no guarantee of a pay award or pay progression.

“Instead, research by the NASUWT has demonstrated that too many schools are diverting money away from teachers to fund inflation-busting pay rises for senior managers.

“Last year, the combined effect of the Government’s pay cap and discretionary pay in schools meant that the average pay award for classroom teachers last year was just 0.6%.

“The Government has imposed pay reforms on teachers that have not only created financial hardship for many, but also growing inequality.”

Dr Roach said the growing inequality and institutionalised discrimination in some schools saw some women teachers earning just 85% of their male counterparts and BME teachers earning less than white teachers.

He added: “The fight to end the cap on public sector pay must be our priority. But, our fight must not end there. We must also continue our fight to end the pay cap and end discriminatory pay practices. “Deliver pay justice for all workers, not just the few.”

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GCSE RESULTS IN ENGLAND

NASUWT COMMENTS ON GCSE RESULTS IN ENGLAND

Commenting on the GCSE results, Chris Keates, General Secretary of the NASUWT-The Teachers’ Union, said:

“The fact that there has been a small overall fall in outcomes is to be expected and is the consequence of the changes to both the grading system in English and maths and changes to the accountability system.

“The fact that such relatively stable results have been achieved against a backdrop of uncertainty and anxiety caused by the rushed reforms to the grading system and the ongoing resource pressures within schools is a great tribute to the hard work and dedication of the young people and their teachers.

 

“This year’s enforced changes to the grading of maths and English created great uncertainty for pupils, teachers, parents and employers. Schools have been forced largely to navigate the way for themselves largely due to the rushed and poorly planned reform timescale imposed by the Government.

 

“Fortunately they were able to come through for the young people involved, driven by the recognition of the importance of these examinations to the life chances of pupils.  The expectation that schools will continually plug the gap for Government failures simply cannot continue.

 

“Before rolling out the new grades to further subjects, the Government must learn from the mistakes of the last twelve months and provide clear and timely guidance to schools to prevent a repeat of the unnecessary anxiety, confusion and additional workload which has added to the pressures teachers are already facing.

 

“Once again the adverse impact of the EBacc is evident in the alarming drop in the number of students taking artistic, practical and creative subjects at GCSE.

“The NASUWT has long raised concerns about the EBacc depriving young people of the opportunity to take creative subjects in which many of them have the skills and talents to excel and despite the clear link of many of these subjects to careers and occupations in sectors in which the UK leads the field.

“This clearly shows the Government’s high-stakes accountability regime and its pointless EBacc measure is denying children the opportunity to access the broad and balanced curriculum to which they are entitled.”

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A-LEVEL RESULTS

 

NASUWT COMMENTS ON A-LEVEL RESULTS

Commenting on the A-level results, Chris Keates, General Secretary of the NASUWT – The Teachers’ Union, said:

“These results have been achieved, by the hard work and commitment young people and their teachers, despite the upheaval to syllabuses and year on year cuts to resources.

 

“In the face of such turbulence, it is a tribute to the hard work and dedication of teachers and students that standards overall have been maintained.

 

“There are some early indications that the move to greater examined content in these qualifications may be having an impact on the outcomes achieved by some learners although more examination of the data will be required before any definitive conclusions can be reached. It will be important for the awarding bodies and the regulator to study any trends in this respect as the qualification reform process continues.

“Good A-level results improve the life choices of young people whether they choose higher education or an alternative path.

“University is not right for everybody, and it is important that the Government does more to support young people who choose to go directly into employment, by providing more opportunities through high quality work placements and apprenticeships.

“While celebrating today the achievements of these students it’s important to remember that there is still a great deal to be done to remove the barriers to educational achievement created by poverty and disadvantage. Everyone should have an equal opportunity to develop their skills and talents.”

 

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PUBLICATION OF SCHOOL TEACHERS’ PAY AND CONDITIONS DOCUMENT

NASUWT COMMENTS ON PUBLICATION OF SCHOOL TEACHERS’ PAY AND CONDITIONS DOCUMENT

 

Commenting on the publication of the School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document 2017, Chris Keates, General Secretary of the NASUWT-The Teachers’ Union, said:

 

“Whilst it is right that the Government has accepted the recommendations of the School Teachers’ Review Body report, these should be implemented in full and there must be no cherry-picking.

 

“The pay review body has rightly reminded schools that pupil achievements are dependent on schools maintaining a strong cadre of teachers and that ‘this will require school leaders and governing bodies to make best use of their people and give the necessary priority to teachers’ pay within their schools’ budgets.’

 

“However, the evidence confirms that to date teachers have not had any protection as a result of the Government’s 1% pay cap, and increasing numbers of teachers are reporting real financial hardship for the first time in decades.

 

“Latest statistics indicate that over a quarter of teachers are having to rely on credit cards, overdrafts and payday loans in order to make ends meet every month, and many new and recently qualified teachers who are unable to afford to rent or buy a home.

 

“The NASUWT is writing to all employers to put them on notice that all teachers should receive a minimum 1% uplift to their pay this year and that teachers on the Main Pay Range should expect a minimum uplift of at least 2%, in accordance with the Review Body’s report.

 

“At a time when pupils’ education is being placed at risk because of the continuing recruitment and retention crisis, schools cannot afford not to pay teachers.”

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EPI CLOSING THE GAP REPORT

NASUWT COMMENTS ON EPI CLOSING THE GAP REPORT

 

Commenting on the Education Policy Institute’s Closing the Gap report into the progress made by the Government to narrow the pupil attainment gap, Chris Keates, General Secretary of the NASUWT-The Teachers’ Union, said:

 

“The findings of this report are sadly unsurprising. Factors which are common among pupils who are falling behind their peers include child poverty, insecure housing, poor physical and mental health among families and job insecurity. These have all seen an increase as a result of the Government’s austerity programme and reforms to welfare.

 

“Schools are striving to do the best for every child they teach, but schools alone cannot tackle these social issues and plug the gap made by cuts to wider services and basic support on which many families rely and which help to provide children with the stability they need in order to focus on their learning and achieve at school.

 

“The task of schools in closing the attainment gap is made even harder when teacher supply is in crisis as a result of attacks on teachers’ pay, working conditions and professionalism.

 

“Our children cannot afford to wait the three generations this report predicts it will take, on current trends, to close the pupil attainment gap. We need effective action from the Government on education, health, housing and the economy to tackle the root causes of the disadvantage and poverty which are key inhibitors to educational progression.”

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ACADEMIES CUT SPENDING ON TEACHERS BUT PAY OUT MILLIONS TO CONSULTANTS

ACADEMIES CUT SPENDING ON TEACHERS BUT PAY OUT MILLIONS TO CONSULTANTS

 

Commenting on the DfE’s data on income and expenditure on academies in England, Chris Keates, General Secretary of the NASUWT-The Teachers’ Union, said:

 

“The DfE’s report raises deep concerns about how public funds are being spent in academies.

 

“The School Teachers’ Review Body reported earlier this month the falling levels of spending on teachers in academies. The DfE now has confirmed that spending on teachers amounts to only 50.1% (or just over half) of the total of academies’ expenditure.

 

“Teaching assistants who provide vital in-class support account for only 11.8% of academies’ total spending; only slightly more than academies are spending on administrative costs-11.5% (£2.1 billion).

 

“Spending on educational consultants  is a scandalously high at £172 million plus.

 

“That expenditure on consultants and administration is prioritised over teachers and other staff demonstrates that the freedoms and flexibilities these schools enjoy are being abused. Failing to prioritise expenditure on teachers puts at risk the education of children and young people. Parents, the public and politicians should be concerned by these figures.”

 

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NO CREDIBLE GOVERNMENT STRATEGY TO TACKLE THE BURDENS ON

NO CREDIBLE GOVERNMENT STRATEGY TO TACKLE THE BURDENS ON TEACHERS

 

Commenting on the information released by the Labour Party on increasing class sizes, Chris Keates, General Secretary of the NASUWT-The Teachers’ Union, said:

 

“Large class sizes are just one of the key drivers of the excessive workload which is blighting the teaching profession and fuelling a deepening teacher supply crisis.

 

“The Government has no credible strategy to tackle seriously and effectively the unacceptable burdens being placed on teachers, be they generated by large classes, bureaucratic marking and assessment policies or any of the other issues teachers have identified.

 

“Consequently, this Government is failing teachers and the children and young people they teach.”

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